A Forgotten Persecution

The plight of Eritrean asylum seekers in Israel has been identified by the Barnabas Fund. It’s a story that needs to be told.

Holot was originally built in 2014 for Eritrean and Sudanese refugees, but now mainly houses Eritreans. Behind the wire and searchlights are over 3,000 men, 95% of whom are Christians. Women, children and the elderly Eritreans are not detained: most eke out a living doing menial work in Israeli cities, sometimes assisted by aid organisations such as the Eritrean Women’s Community Centre (EWCC) in Tel Aviv, which is funded by Barnabas Fund. 1

The majority of Eritreans fled their home country because of either religious persecution or conscription: military service is indefinite and can last years, even decades. About 36,000 Eritrean asylum seekers currently live in Israel, but are not recognised as refugees. They are unable to access education, employment, healthcare and social services. The estimated 7,000 Eritrean women are particularly isolated.

Thinking about Balfour

Nick Gray of Balfour 100 examines how Christians shaped the modern Middle East a hundred years ago 

There are many centenaries to be marked at the moment, as we progress through 100 years since the “war to end all wars” took place. So many of these remind us of the horrific and tragic loss of life incurred on all sides of the conflict in battles big and small between 1914 and 1918. November 2017, however, sees the centenary of a political expression of intent made in the midst of wartime strategy that went on to become one of the most influential yet controversial documents in 20th century history.

The Balfour Declaration, named after the Foreign Secretary of the day who signed it, was an expression of approval for the concept of establishing a homeland for the Jewish people in the area that was biblical Israel but was then known as “Palestine” . It was an attempt to combine British strategic needs and the historical justice of returning a dispersed Jewish people to their biblical and historical homeland.

Not Peace, Submission

Most of us come from migrant stock at some point. Why then are so many concerned that Muslim migration means something different? Wilfred Wong unpacks the meaning of ‘Hijra’…

In the Islamic view, all of Mankind will one day accept Islam or submit to its rule. ‘Islam’ means ‘submission’ [not ‘peace’ – Ed] and the reference to submitting to the rule of Islam is ominous, because this submission may be forced and not by choice. 

Islam distinguishes between those countries dominated by Islam and those that are not. The former is referred to as “Dar Al Islam” , the House of Islam, whereas the Non-Muslim parts of the world are “Dar Al Harb” , the House of War, which Muslims are supposed to fight against until they submit to Islam.  

Costly consequences

Almost 50 years on from the 1967 Abortion Act, Dr Adele Pilkington reviews the grim realities of what has become a consumer industry…

On 27th October 1967, in a half-empty House of Commons, Parliament voted to decriminalise abortion. Since 1967 more than 8.4 million unborn babies have been ‘legally’ killed in the UK, equivalent to the combined population of Scotland and Wales. Since abortion was first legalised in the former Soviet Union in 1920, there have been over one billion babies killed worldwide1.

The Abortion Act does not currently apply in Northern Ireland, although the British Pregnancy Advisory Service (BPAS) and British Humanist Association are determined to change this, and could be assisted by the recent change in power sharing within the devolved legislature of Northern Ireland.2

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